Back to High School Giveaway Basket (Worth $285.000)




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Welcome to BJ's Back to High School Basket Giveaway!

We are offering 10 resources and curricula under 8 subject categories!  To help make you high school homeschool FUN, more interesting, and more fulfilling this fall!

It was so fun to put this basket together for you!  I hope that you will enter and I hope that you will win!

My basket includes stuff for Social Studies, English, Science Fairs, Life Science, Nature Study, Pastel Art, and a complete course in Drawing, offered by Oak Meadow Homeschool Publications. Let's start with Social Studies, from the 7 Sisters Homeschool:

1.  Social Studies

Are you looking for a good course in World History for your teen that is fun and without any busy-work?
7 Sisters Homeschool offers this complete course for just that, with a Christian point of view.




This course, was made by Vicki Tillman from 7 Sisters blog, a homeschool mom who taught at a high school co-op for years, and a Phd in Philosophy.  It is a year long course, perfect for your teen's social studies credit it World History.  And it includes Church History notes as well.

This user friendly, college prep ebook is written in conversational style, with pictures, maps, vocabulary lists, comprehension questions, and even tests and an answer key. History and Philosophy of the Western World  is ideal for independent study, but I think it will also make very interesting and FUN dinner table family conversation, too!  I have such great memories of that!

2.  English

Would you like to make your own course for high school English this year?

We loved making our own homemade course for British Lit during high school.  We picked the novels that my daughter was interested in and then chose Literature Guides to go with them.  That gave our daughter guidance in literary analysis and also essay writing practice.

Here are three books to get your started if you want to make your own course.


GIVEAWAY 
3 Novels and 1 Literature Guide ($26.00)


This includes: -The novel Beowulf ($11.95)
                        - Literature Guide to Beowulf ($15.85)                             
                        - A Midsummer Night's Dream novel ($4.75)
                        - Huckleberry Finn novel ($4.50)

Now that we talked about Social Studies and English, let's move onto our Science Giveaways....

3.  Science 

Why not put together your own course in science?  Choose a topic of your teen's interest and let your student loose,... researching it on the web.

Have you seen the Science in Action book, from aBeka?

This book can be a helpful guide for just that kind of thing, including how to prepare for a science fair!  Does your teen have an interest in participating in a science fair?  This book will prepare them for that, with tips on doing library research, oral presentations, and the skinny on how to put together everything for a stellar science fair exhibit.

GIVEAWAY - Science in Action - A Science Project Guide ($12.30)


This project guide uses step by step instructions to walk your teen through planning, experimenting, reporting and presenting the findings of a complete science project, with samples included.  Helpful worksheets too, for selecting a topic, getting started, and more. If your student is college bound, what a great way for them to show the colleges their critical thinking skills!  

Or does your teen have an interest in the Life Sciences?  That's #4 on our giveaway list....

4.  Life Science

Eva Varga, from Eva Varga.net, is offering three courses in Life Science, including Botany, Zoology and Ecology.  Eva is a former middle school science teacher, who is homeschooling her two kids, one of whom is now a high schooler.  

Put your own course together in Life Science, by using these three science ebooks, which are part of our giveaway....

GIVEAWAY

 by Eva Varga


This includes: 1. Botany 
                          2.  Zoology 
                          3.  Ecology 

Click here and scroll down to see all three of these great ebooks!

Although these courses were written to the middle schooler, they can make a great spine for your high school course in Life Science, by starting with them, and then adding in some more web research on topics of interest.  

Or combine these Life Science courses with  the Science in Action book described above, and enter a Life Science project into a Science Fair!   


Eva is offering a SALE on all 3 of her Life Science ebooks this month!  Click here, then use this code "iWant3" to reach her super sale.

What would high school Science be without some Nature Study?   That's # 5 on our list today...  

           
5.  Nature Study

Would you like to add nature study to your high schooler's day?  Or even make a whole course in nature study, for a credit in Environmental Studies!

Cindy has tons of resources for doing just that, plus lots more other books, such as guides for Charlotte Mason homeschooling on her site at Our Journey Westward.  Today she is giving away a deep and thorough unit study focusing on streams and creeks.


GIVEAWAY  






Now for my favorite subject, Fine Arts!

6.  Fine Arts

Awe, nothing like taking an art break from the academics in the afternoon!  You Are an Artist offers both frugal and complete chalk pastel courses that are semester based, and are perfect for a high school art credit.  Here is their very well put together chalk pastel art course for fall semester.

NOT PART OF THE GIVEAWAY

They also offer a number of smaller courses, which can be used alone, or  combined to make your own art course.  Tricia is offering this special one for our giveaway, which I think is perfect to go along with your nature studies.


GIVEAWAY 



The Bird Chalk Pastels Art Course is video based and would go along so well with your teen's high school science studies.  Or use it as a base for making your own art course!  

Click around to check out their other wonderful VIDEO chalk pastel courses.

Are you a fan of Oak Meadow?  They offer homeschool curricula from K - 12, focusing on project based learning.  We loved using OM for English and Social Studies in our homeschool for many years.  They offer a wonderful course in ART, focused on Drawing.....

Oak Meadow Homeschool Publications offers this complete art course, focusing on drawing and using the right side of your mind.  It is all set up for you, using the following two books:

GIVEAWAY 
Oak Meadow High School Art Course
($82.95)


 This includes:


This course begins with simple line drawing exercises and progresses through still life drawing, landscapes, and self-portraits.  Students learn the basics of perspective, shading, proportion, color and compositional balance.

Let's move onto #7, a guide to planning high school, and dealing with those details of - transcripts, course description, college essays and more....


What if your teen decides they want to go to college? What do you need to know then?  

My book spells that out for you, as not everything that you need to know will be on the college websites. 

My friends tell me that it is easy to read, with printables for each chapter, unlike a lot of those books about college, which make things look so complicated!



GIVEAWAY 
 Homeschooling High School with College in Mind 

My daughter got into each college that she applied to, with her homemade homeschool transcript.  I wrote this book to encourage others who are looking at the college option.

Use what I have learned to make it easier! 

Why reinvent the wheel?

Here are the chapters and each one has printables:

Researching College Entrance Requirements
Planning High School with College in Mind 
Choosing High School Curriculum
Assigning High School Credit
Making Your Transcripts (Calculating the GPA, etc)
Electives and College
Writing the College Essay
Course Descriptions and Reference Letters
Preparing your Teen for College Writing
Don't Forget the FUN!




 SALE  
 - ONLY $3.99 -
thru August 14th

with

13 DOWNLOADABLE PRINTABLES



This includes 12 exclusive planning printables, plus an editable transcript form, ready for you to fill in. 

Amy from Rock Your Homeschool says:

"Watch your fears about homeschooling high school vanish as you read this book!  An absolute MUST-HAVE BOOK for homeschoolers!  I was nervous wreck and put off planning for high school.  Betsy put me at ease with her encouragement and experiences....."

 KINDLE is on Amazon here


Subscribers will get the first chapter free. And I do NO email marketing.

Click here to get yours!
 "Researching College Entrance Requirements" 


And finally, here is something for you and your teen, that you could work with together.....actually, I mean play with together...

8.  I am offering one package of clay!  Take a look at the basket picture again....you will see the clay there.  

When you have a hard day, and need a break, why not take the clay out and make something with it?
It is great for free forming, hand forming, and it can be just air dried.

My teen and I had a lot of fun with it on our days, when we SO needed a break!

ENTER THE GIVEAWAY HERE: Monday, August 7th this will be live!



Thanks for stopping by BJ's Homeschool.  I hope you are having a good summer break, and have lots of great memories made during this summer to treasure.

To reach all the other great iHN Back to School Giveaway Baskets, just click here.




Have a blessed day,

Betsy

Betsy is a veteran homeschooler who loves unit studies and hands-on learning, mixed in with Charlotte Mason approaches. She homeschooled her daughter from preschool through high school, and helped her get accepted to mulitple colleges. Betsy blogs about her journey at BJ's Homeschool about the early yearshigh school and college too.

Want to stay in touch?  

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Click here to get yours.

This post was shared on my favorite linkups here.

103 comments:

  1. The hardest thing for me is making sure they get all their tests scheduled and done (like the ACT or SAT).

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    1. For sure! That was our hardest thing, too. Once we got that done, we both took a breath and relaxed. I like how the Khan Academy now offers a joint study program with the College Board for free. Have you heard of it? More info on my post here if you like - https://betsyhomeschoolconsulting.blogspot.com/2017/04/bjs-guide-to-sat-keeping-it-simple-and.html

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  2. So far, the hardest thing about high school is keeping quiet about figuring colleges and careers. My kiddo is overwhelmed thinking about those things right now, so we are still trying to remember to let her evolve at her own pace so she can be as happy and confident as she can be.
    Jenn M. from Enumclaw

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    1. How wonderful for you to do that for her. My teen thought she wanted to go into business, to major in that in college. Then soon she changed her mind. That is why we did not do the whole dual credit thing, as for us, that gave her to time to find out what she really wanted to do. So now she is a political science major instead.

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  3. Im so glad I found your site!! Such great info!! Thank you!

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    1. Thank you! I hope it is an encouragement to you, going forward.

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  4. Hardest thing about homeschooling by teen is that he has no idea of what he'd like to do for the future- so setting a 4 year plan that includes community college? Or a plan for trade school? or basic classes to get into a 4 year college? or I have told him if he has a business plan in place by graduation then the is fine too... but right now he is 14 is happy to "exist" :).

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    1. That is similar to mine. At 14, she was all about learning about aviation, writing short stories, and interested in irish dance. I am so glad that we did not push her to decide on her major until she was a sophomore in college. Taking time for your teen, I think that is priceless.

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  5. The hardest thing about homeschooling high school is trying to find things that interest them. I have boys, and nothing seems to cApture their attention.

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    1. I hope that they start showing your their interests, to help things along. I bet that it's the core studies that they find boring. Mine liked aviation so much as a 10th grader, that we made all of her writing assignments to focus on that, lol.

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  6. Hardest: Choosing curriculum that suits their learning style and scheduling.

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    1. I agree, Sharon. Sometimes we had to change things out in the middle of the year. My daughter did not do well with Teaching Textbooks, she could not retain the info, so we switched to Monarch, and that was a help. It seems that high school is SO busy, with so much to fit in!

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  7. I don't have a high schooler yet. I'm entering this giveaway in anticipation of the coming years. These look like fantastic resources. I'm nervous about getting to the high school stage and having to deal with transcripts!

    Sarah M.
    ninemoreweeks@yahoo.com

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    1. You know, I was afraid of doing the transcripts, too. When I did ours, I found it was not so hard to do. My book has a sample transcript, an editable transcript form, ready for you to fill in, and also lots of tips for doing them. But I remember how nervous I was, I can so relate to that!

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  8. The hardest thing about both homeschooling my teen and helping him apply to college has been teaching him to write an effective essay.

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    1. For sure, Amy. That is such an important skill for college, and I lucked out, as my daughter had a strong interest in writing. She preferred creative writing though!

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  9. Mine is actually in middle school at the moment but we're keeping an eye out now on what's involved with homeschooling high school. Thanks for the opportunity to win your book and other goodies! :)

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    1. Sure, Becki! You are way ahead of the game, checking out high school stuff as a middle school mom.

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  10. The hardest thing is feeling like I'm running out of time to teach them all the things I want to teach them. Truly!

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    1. Why is it that our teens grow up so quickly, anyway, Amber? Mine is now a rising senior in college...and I am still getting used to the fact that she is almost done with college. I have found that I still am teaching her things, even while she is in college.

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  11. The hardest thing is keeping them interested.

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    1. I agree, Julia. Mine did not like studying the math courses that were required during high school.

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  12. Keeping them on task and keeping records !!!
    Linda Marie Finn

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    1. Yes, I have been there for both of those stresses, Linda. The hardest for me was the record keeping. And keeping everything organized so that I could find it when I needed it.

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  13. The hardest thing for me in homeschooling high school is the record keeping for college applications. I have learned that it is better to keep detailed records and write transcript and course descriptions at the end of each year instead of doing them all at application time.

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    1. You sound like you have already graduated a student, Trena. I found that out the hard way when we hit 10th grade, and I had not done the course descriptions for 9th.

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  14. Not overwhelming them with too much "school."

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    1. Yes, Jennifer, why is it that they need to do so much as far as core studies, when they also need time to discover who they are and what they may want to do when they grow up.

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  15. The hardest thing for me homeschooling high school is making due km getting them all the credits they need to graduate.

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    1. Yes, I remember that from our homeschool. I focused on the college entrance requirements, as mine was college bound. You know we don't have to do the graduation requirements set out for public school students. Most states don't have graduation requirements in their homeschool laws. If you have any questions on that, just send me an IM at BJ's Homeschool facebook page. Thanks for stopping by, Letara!

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  16. The hardest thing so far has been keeping records...or knowing what records to keep and making sure that I have everything I need...

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    1. Yes, I actually kept more records than I needed to! That's why I wrote my book, to help other families to know what they needed to keep, and to have downloadable printables for doing that. Nice to meet you, Wendi!

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  17. Time. You think you have plenty of it, and you don't. I want them to have time to explore career options, and complete credits.

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    1. Yes! That was me, too. We avoided the dual credit route as for us, I wanted my daughter to have the time to just be a high schooler and to be able to try different activities and hobbies, to discover her interests. Good point, Kathleen.

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  18. My oldest has just turned thirteen at the beginning of this year. The hardest thing about homeschooling him is that he is so different than my younger son in terms of ability and learning style. I often feel stretched between the two - especially as my teen needs lots of one on one attention.

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    1. I bet, Nicole. Once you have homeschooling down, then you find it is totally different for child #2! How great that you are already looking into high school, so far ahead of the time!

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  19. The hardest thing has been not getting so caught up in grades and test scores and peer pressure that I lose what made our homeschool great up to high school.

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    1. Yes, thecoolmom, with all the pressure that we feel re college, and that seems to be all around us, when we have high schoolers, I also found it hard to let go, and just enjoy watching my teen growing up. But boy did I have so much more time with my teen, than I would have had if she were not homeschooled.

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  20. The hardest thing is meeting her needs and graduation requirements. They do not always track together. Needs being educationally and socially and faith. I put way too much pressure on me and it leaks onto her. Learning to enjoy these last few years together.

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    1. No they sure don't, Joan. Getting in those college entrance requirements took a lot of time away from my teen's activities. I have noticed that the colleges that my daughter applied to a few years ago, have actually become easier to get into! And that seems to be the trend. SO that may help the teens coming in.

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  21. The hardest part of homeschooling high school is knowing it will end. They are maturing and arriving at the end of there home education. I love to see them accomplish so much but hate to see their empty seat at the dinner table.

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    1. I am at that season, myself, Aimee. Our daughter is commuting to college, but so often is busy and at campus, that we hardly see her for dinner. At the same time, we set up lunches and such, and that helps a lot. I got to see her graduate from a leadership program last spring, and that was so lovely. Makes it all worth it. And hopefully, in a few or more years....maybe a grandchild will be added to our family.

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  22. The hardest thing has been knowing when to just "let it go" for the day or even the year without letting them give up.

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    1. That is a hard one, Nicole. We often headed out to the park with our cameras, on a hard day. Hope you will have a good, encouraging year with your teens.

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  23. The hardest thing about homeschooling teens is that they need to be taught so many different things. :)

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    1. Yes, I used online help for math and science and I so needed to do that. My husband also helped out with history, as he loves US History.

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  24. Our hardest moments have been keeping my daughter on the task and not going off on educational tangents

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    1. Yeah, they can do that, can't they, Kerry, when they are young. But high school seems to demand much more concentration. Gotta have fun, though too!

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  25. The hardest part for me is letting them be more independent.

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    1. Yes, for sure. Sometimes it was hard for me to let go and let her take it on, you know, Misty?

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  26. The hardest part is paying for the curriculum. The best part is having great conversations with my teens.

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    1. Oh, the conversations! I loved that part of it, too.

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  27. The hardest part is being still fairly new at homeschooling/worrying about doing my best to guide and teach him well.

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    1. Those of us who worry about doing a good job homeschooling, are usually the ones who have nothing to worry about, really! Wishing you a great year with your teen.

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  28. The hardest part of homeschooling my teen is that he is too independent. (Never wants help.) The best part of spending time with my teen is getting to know and see the wonderful man he is becoming.

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    1. Geri, you must have a super son there! Yes, the too independent thing...Mine is like that too, which makes it hard to find ways to help, when they do need the help. But I think that our independent teens will turn out to be quite confident adults.

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  29. The hardest thing is teaching them to be accountable for completing their academic work to the best of their ability. The best part is having time with them and being an integral part of their lives.

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    1. An integral part of their lives, what a give that is for us homeschooling moms. And it is just at that right time when they are finding out who they are, and what they may want to do with their lives.

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  30. We haven't hit the teen years yet, but if it's anything like homeschooling my gifted 9yo, it's the difference between his IQ and his EQ.

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    1. Oh, yes, I can so relate to that, That Bald Chick, IQ and EQ. Thanks for stopping by BJ's Homeschool.

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  31. The easiest and best part is seeing her growth in faith and wanting to help others. The hardest part is the ups and downs.

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    1. How wonderful to see her growing in her faith. Thanks for stopping by, At Home is where life happens, and I love your name, that is so true!

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  32. Homeschooling a middle school child right now but already looking and researching high school material.

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    1. Matt's Mommy, you are so ahead of the game and on the ball. Planning ahead was a real help for us, too.

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  33. We are just beginning and this looks like a great deal of help!

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    1. I hope it will be, and I have to go to the giveaway site, and see who won!

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  34. The hardest thing is finding topics that will keep her motivated. The best part is just being able to spend the time with her, talking, learning and living.

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    1. We are so glad that we homeschooled, for those talking, learning and living times together!

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  35. The hardest is keeping them motivated and the best is enjoying time with them.

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    1. Especially for those math moments, in our house, Adena!

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  36. The hardest part is teaching her how to write a quality essay. The best part is the bonding experience we have had all these years together at home.

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    1. Essay writing, so much is involved in that, isn't it? Have you seen the essay courses from 7 Sisters Homeschool? They have a variety of levels for essay writing and a separate research writing course, too. They are written by homeschool moms. If you are interested, here is their link-----http://7sistershomeschool.com/products-page/essay-writing-curriculum/?wpam_id=17271

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  37. I think teaching writing is one of the hardest things.

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    1. I do, too. For most of us moms, I think it is especially hard to know when we see a good essay or research report. How to evaluate them?! For myself, it was not so hard, as I am a writer, and I have taken a lot of writing classes. But I sure wouldn't want to teach writing to a class of students! One resource that I like is the writing courses from 7 Sisters. They helped my daughter a lot.

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  38. The hardest thing is the roller coaster of emotions while trying to teach some difficult courses. The best thing is we both learn a lot along the journey ��

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    1. Really, learning a lot along the journey. I tell you, I am still a poor speller, and I didn't improve on that during our homeschool years! But I learned a lot of other stuff too, for sure. Oh, the ups and downs of my teen, they are still very fresh in my mind.

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  39. I think that really staying the course when it gets tiring is a challenge.

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    1. For sure, Judi! I remember how sometimes work to be looked at or "graded" would stack up, waiting for me to get to it, especially when I was just not wanting to, or was really tired.

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  40. The hardest thing about homeschooling high school is not knowing for sure what to teach them in case they decide to go to college...and the emotions of teenage girls :0)

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    1. I hope that my book will help you a lot with college, that is why i wrote it! I was very nervous about knocking on the college's door, too, until we saw that our teen got accepted to all them on her list! Be encouraged. Oh, the emotions of our daughter's...I can so relate, and we only have one!

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  41. My daughter is not quite a teen--she'll become one during this year. I love spending extra time with her, but the drama can be difficult at times.

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    1. I know what you mean about drama, Leslie. I am glad that I was there for that anyway, as now that my teen is in college, we are still close and she shares her triumphs and difficulties with me. I think that is because I was there with her during the high school years. Thanks for sharing, Leslie

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  42. The best thing about staying the course through high school is that I feel like I really know my kids! Now that my oldest three are adults and one have them has moved out that is something I would trade for anything.

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    1. No, either, Judi. Now that mine is a senior in college, I am so glad that we got that time during high school to build up our relationship and that has meant so much to us.

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  43. getting my teen motivated is the hardest part

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    1. We had those days, too, especially when it came to writing essays and such, Real-Life-Reviews.

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  44. The hardest is their attitude! Lol Best part is knowing they are safe and being taught with a biblical view.

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    1. Oh, the attitude issue. I remember that so well, Melissa. Also I am so glad that my teen did not have to deal with the culture in the public schools!

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  45. The hardest thing is seeing my highschoolers grow up so fast. The best is being able to watch them grow and spend time with them instead of sending them away for 8 hours and trying to "catch up" when they get home.

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    1. Catching up after ps, that sure would not have worked at all for us, either! And they do grow up SO fast, mine is a senior in college now, starting next month!

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  46. The hardest part is not knowing if I am doing enough to prepare my teen for college. The best part is having the time to teach him important life skills

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  47. The hardest thing is teaching her things I don't know and getting it all done. The best is that we talk about everything.

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  48. hardest thing about homeschooling is learning how to do this homeschooling thing! Last year was our first year, so it was a major learning year for us both! I love having more time with my kids though. we get to do so much more together, than when they are in PS. I'm looking forward to our second year of homeschooling this year. :)

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  49. Homeschooling high school is a big adventure.

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  50. I find the hardest thing about homeschooling my teen is other people, he loves to learn, but other people think homeschooling is not as good as poblic school. But I love it too.

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    1. That is a hard one, Brandi. I felt pressure from some of our family friends. They would call especially at the beginning of the year, and ask about our educational choice. But once she got into college, all they could talk about was how wonderful homeschooling was! I think they worried because they really never understood it, and it was different from their choice.

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  51. The hardest thing is trying to teach the courses I don't feel qualified to teach. The best is having a close relationship with my teen.

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    1. Yes, for us, math was a hard one, and we used some tutoring by the half hour from www.aop.com. It helped us so much. I am glad to see so many onilne helps for math these days. Wishing you a great year!

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  52. A really hard thing about homeschooling high school is that my teens started to notice that we weren't covering the same things in the same order as their public schooled peers and they would question whether they were at grade level.

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    1. Oh, the comparison thing. Mine didn't notice, so that helped us out, lol.

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  53. The hardest thing is making sure he learns everything he needs to be successful. The best thing is being able to be close to my children. While many parents claim their teens pull away from family we are closer than ever. I also love the freedom we have as a homeschooling family.

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    1. Freedom and closeness as a family------Isn't that just wonderful!

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